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"GULLIVER'S TRAVELS"
(2010) (Jack Black, Jason Segel) (PG)


Alcohol/Drugs Minor
Blood/Gross Stuff Moderate
Disrespectful/Bad Attitude Heavy
Frightening/Tense Scenes Moderate
Gun/Weapons Heavy
Imitative Behavior Heavy
Jump Scenes Moderate
Music (Scary/Tense) Heavy
Music (Inappropriate) Minor
Profanity Mild
Sex/Nudity Moderate
Smoking None
Tense Family Scenes Minor
Topics to Talk About Heavy
Violence Heavy


QUICK TAKE:
Fantasy: In modern-day Manhattan, an underachieving mailroom employee lies about being a travel writer and ends up being transported to a land where he is a giant.
PLOT:
Lemuel Gulliver (JACK BLACK) is a career underachiever. He has never made it out of the mail room of a New York publishing company, despite working there for a decade. When his latest subordinate, Dan (T.J. MILLER), gets promoted after just one day on the job, Gulliver decides to finally show some initiative and ask out Darcy Silverman (AMANDA PEET), the features editor he has had a crush on for years.

However, she mistakenly believes that he is interested in writing travel articles for her. In a panic, Gulliver cuts and pastes travel articles he finds on the Internet and passes them off as his own. Impressed, Darcy assigns him a story in the Bermuda Triangle. Once there, he gets caught up in a typhoon that transports him to the magical land of Lilliput where he is a giant among a kingdom of tiny people no bigger than eight or 10 inches high.

He becomes the sworn protector of King Theodore (BILLY CONNOLLY) and his daughter, Princess Mary (EMILY BLUNT); the best friend of the noble peasant Horatio (JASON SEGEL); and the enemy of the egomaniacal General Edward (CHRIS O'DOWD), who eventually betrays the Lilliputians to their sworn enemies. After Gulliver is revealed to be a fraud and a coward, he must find the courage to win back the respect of his new friends and Darcy, who has also become trapped in Lilliput after she discovers Gulliver lied to her about his writing credentials.

WILL KIDS WANT TO SEE IT?
Absolutely. The film has a kid-friendly PG rating, Jack Black has a major following among teens and pre-teens, and the film has been marketed like crazy on Nickelodeon and the Cartoon Network for weeks.
WHY THE MPAA RATED IT: PG
For brief rude humor, mild language and action.
CAST AS ROLE MODELS:
  • JACK BLACK plays a career mailroom clerk who has never applied himself in either his work or personal life. He is smitten with an editor at the newspaper company he works for. To impress her, he lies that he is secretly a travel writer and even forges other writers' work, passing it off as his own. On assignment in the Bermuda Triangle, he is transported to a faraway land where he is a giant and lies to a race of little people that he was a great leader where he came from.
  • AMANDA PEET plays the editor who he is secretly in love with. She is portrayed as a fair-minded executive who does not look down on those who have not achieved as much as her. In fact, when she learns of Gulliver's supposed writing ability, she is very supportive and even gives him an assignment. When it is made clear that he is a fraud, she takes it upon herself to complete his assignment and is also transported to Lilliput.
  • JASON SEGEL plays a noble Lilliputian man who Gulliver befriends. The man is in love with the kingdom's princess, but has drawn the wrath of her overbearing fiancé who has him imprisoned. He is portrayed as a good-hearted, good-humored man who lacks the necessary confidence due to his peasant status in Lilliput.
  • EMILY BLUNT plays the princess who Horatio loves even though her hand in marriage has been promised to her father's top general. She is a strong-willed young woman who ultimately chooses love over obligation.
  • CHRIS O'DOWD plays the petty leader of the Lilliputian army, who treats his fiancée, Princess Mary, like a possession, wrongfully imprisons Horatio, and conspires with his kingdom's sworn enemies to defeat Gulliver and enslave his own people.
  • BILLY CONNOLLY plays Princess Mary's father, who takes most people at their word to the detriment of his own kingdom. He is lied to by Gulliver and betrayed by General Edward.
  • T.J. MILLER plays a coworker of Gulliver's in Manhattan, who is promoted after one day on the job and then openly puts down Gulliver for his lack of ambition.
  • CAST, CREW, & TECHNICAL INFO

    HOW OTHERS RATED THIS MOVIE


    Curious if this title is entertaining, any good, and/or has any artistic merit?
    Then read OUR TAKE of this film.


    (Note: The "Our Take" review of this title examines the film's artistic merits and does not take into account any of the possibly objectionable material listed below).


    OUR WORD TO PARENTS:
    The following is a brief summary of the content found in this fantasy film that has been rated PG. Profanity consists of at least 5 variations on the term "lame ass," while other colorful phrases are also uttered. Little in the way of sexually related content is present, but two prominent female characters do show off period-costume cleavage throughout much of the film. Also, the lead male character is often seen shirtless, and in one scene we see his partially bare buttocks.

    Violence consists of tiny people being picked up and deposited elsewhere by a giant-sized Jack Black. A bare-chested Jack Black is shot with dozens of cannonballs at one point, and he retaliates by flinging the cannonballs back at the armada of tiny naval ships that has come to attack him. This results in numerous explosions, putting a myriad of tiny people in peril. He also splashes ocean water on the ships, which are like tidal waves to the wee ones manning the various boats.

    Black eventually fights an equally giant-sized robot, and the ensuing WWE-style battle entails wedgies, much pushing and shoving, punches, body-slams, and tripping. During the fight, the robot - under control of the lead villain -- shoots electricity at the title character resulting in Gulliver feeling some fairly significant pain. The human controlling the machine is eventually punched out by a woman. Such scenes and moments of potential peril (including the frequent threat of little people being stepped on by the giant-sized Jack Black, which never happens) could be unsettling and/or suspenseful for various viewers.

    Bad attitudes are present throughout, as is some potentially imitative behavior and various thematic elements. The title character puts out a fire by urinating on it, with his stream also soaking at least two major characters. The film's villain, meanwhile, is shown drinking in one scene.

    If you're still concerned about the film and its appropriateness for yourself or anyone else in your home who may be interested in seeing it, we suggest that you take a closer look at our detailed listings for more specific information regarding the film's content.

    For those prone to visually induced motion sickness, the film is being shown in 3-D in select theaters. There are also a large number of scenes in which the lead character is a giant among tiny characters, and a camera trick known as "forced perspective" is frequently used that could result in some disorientation among the most sensitive.


    ALCOHOL OR DRUG USE
  • Gulliver asks co-worker Dan if he'd like to "go for some brews."
  • When talking with Princess Mary in her chambers, General Edwards pours himself what looks like some kind of liquor or spirit and drinks from it.
  • BLOOD/GROSS STUFF
  • Gulliver's partially bare backside is visible throughout a good part of his first encounter with the Lilliputians. When he is tripped up, he lands buttocks first on a Lilliputian and it is insinuated that the little guy went up Gulliver's sphincter.
  • To put out a ranging fire, Gulliver drops his pants (no nudity) and literally pees out the flames. His stream also drenches King Theodore, one of his subjects, and General Edward.
  • Numerous red welts dot Gulliver's chest and stomach after he is hit repeatedly by tiny cannonball fire.
  • A child force-feeds a tiny-sized Gulliver a bottle of milk and then pats him hard on the back, causing him to burp loudly.
  • Both Horatio and Gulliver bear slight facial injuries - small bruising, very minor blood trickles -- as a result of their climactic fight with General Edward and his giant robot. General Edward's face is bloodier than the other two in the aftermath of the battle.
  • DISRESPECTFUL/BAD ATTITUDE
  • Gulliver throws one employee's mail at him, knocking over some items on his desk.
  • As Gulliver's new boss, Dan tells him that he has peaked and will never be more than a mailroom clerk.
  • Gulliver lies to Darcy about being a world traveler and a writer. When she asks to see copies of his work, he goes on the Internet and cuts and pastes professionally written travel articles and passes them off as his own.
  • General Edward dismisses his fiancée, Princess Mary, by calling her "My innocent, naïve, little butterfly."
  • We are told that General Edward has imprisoned Horatio for simply looking at Princess Mary the wrong way.
  • General Edward forces Gulliver to submit to slave labor.
  • Gulliver pees on King Theodore, one of his subjects, and General Edward as he tries to put out a fire.
  • General Edward brags about pillaging villages.
  • General Edward refers to Gulliver throughout the film as a "beast." He also describes him as a "gargantuan fool" and as "fat."
  • Gulliver lies to the Lilliputians that he was the "president" of the island he came from (Manhattan) and that he has left his Vice President "Yoda" in charge in his absence. He lies that he has a queen waiting for him back home, and he fills in his background and fake heroic exploits by likening his life story to the events in such movies as "The Empire Strikes Back," "Titanic," and "Avatar."
  • After being demoted, General Edward sabotages Lilliput's island defenses to force Gulliver to ward off an enemy attack alone.
  • A little girl who appears giant sized to Gulliver rips the head off a small stuffed animal to get Gulliver to take part in a tea party.
  • General Edward betrays his people and conspires with the enemy to build a giant robot that will defeat Gulliver and bring Lilliput to its knees.
  • General Edward has the royal family imprisoned.
  • General Edward attempts to take Princess Mary hostage.
  • FRIGHTENING SCENES
  • Scenes listed under "Violence" and/or "Jump Scenes" may be unsettling and/or suspenseful to very young viewers.
  • On the open sea, Gulliver and his boat get swept up in a fairly scary storm and typhoon.
  • Lilliput comes under attack by a rival army of little people who set fire to several buildings. One of the buildings traps Princess Mary's father and one of his loyal subjects. Gulliver comes to the rescue.
  • What appears to be a small, trashcan-like robot loudly and swiftly transforms into an intimidating robot intent on harming Gulliver.
  • Trapped on a remote island where he is now a little person trapped inside a young girl's elaborate dollhouse, Gulliver takes the helmet off what he thinks is a pilot action figure and it turns out to be a real skeleton with a fairly creepy skull.
  • Gulliver and General Edward, inside the giant robot controlling its actions, have a climactic rematch. The robot can now shoot electrical currents at its targets, which causes Gulliver considerable pain.
  • GUNS/WEAPONS
  • Both the Lilliputian army and a rival army arm themselves with swords, spears, and other primitive weaponry throughout the movie.
  • Gulliver has actors stage the climactic duel between Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker in "The Empire Strikes Back" using mock lightsabers.
  • The enemy army's warships are equipped with cannons, which they use to fire at Gulliver.
  • General Edward attacks Gulliver with a giant-sized Transformer-like robot that can shoot electricity at its targets.
  • IMITATIVE BEHAVIOR
  • Phrases: "I'm a big lame ass," "I am the biggest lame ass in all the land," "Dang it," "It blows," "Doggie wants a bone?" "Wanna shoot some poos, go for some brews?" "Mealtime, beast!" "He's a big, ugly beast," "She-beast!" "That angry, little dingleberry," "Those villages shant pillage themselves!" "That gargantuan fool," "Well done, you big fat beast," "Hey sexy," "I find you incredibly sexy," "It hurts my butt!" and "My innocent, naïve, little butterfly."
  • There is a boat in the film that is named "Ship Happens."
  • Gulliver throws one employee's mail at him, knocking over some items on his desk.
  • Gulliver lies to Darcy about being a world traveler and a writer. When she asks to see copies of his work, he goes on the Internet and cuts and pastes professionally written travel articles and passes them off as his own.
  • A cab driver in Bermuda drives fast and erratically for no real reason.
  • Gulliver falls asleep at the wheel of his boat.
  • To put out a fire, Gulliver urinates on the flames.
  • Gulliver lies to the Lilliputians that he was the "president" of the island he came from (Manhattan) and that he has left his Vice President "Yoda" in charge in his absence. He lies that he has a queen waiting for him back home, and he fills in his background and fake heroic exploits by likening his life story to the events in such movies as "The Empire Strikes Back," "Titanic," and "Avatar."
  • Gulliver uses his newfound celebrity to get the Lilliputians to build him an elaborate house, erect billboards and sell memorabilia with his likeness on them, and even give him massages.
  • Acting on bad advice from Gulliver, Horatio tries to attract Princess Mary by acting disinterested when all she wants is his kindness and open heart.
  • A robot, under Edward's direction, gives Gulliver a "wedgie" (it grabs him by the underpants and lifts him off the ground).
  • A little girl who appears giant sized to Gulliver rips the head off a small stuffed animal to get Gulliver to take part in a tea party. She also dresses Gulliver up in a girl's costume and forces him to play with other toys against his will.
  • JUMP SCENES
  • Gulliver wakes up at the controls of his boat to find himself heading into a scary storm.
  • Trapped inside a child's dollhouse, Gulliver takes the helmet off what he thinks is a pilot action figure only to discover it's a real human skeleton.
  • What appears to be a small, trashcan-like robot loudly and swiftly transforms into an intimidating robot intent on harming Gulliver.
  • MUSIC (SCARY/TENSE)
  • A heavy amount of tense music occurs in the film.
  • MUSIC (INAPPROPRIATE)
  • KISS' rock anthem "Rock and Roll All Nite," which extols the pleasures of living a rock n' roll lifestyle and partying every day, is played at a couple of points during the film.
  • Gulliver and the rest of the cast sing Edwin Starr's classic song "War," which repeats the lyric "War, huh, good God!" and "Good God, y'all!" numerous times.
  • PROFANITY
  • At least five variations on the term "lame ass."
  • There is a boat in the film that is named "Ship Happens."
  • Gulliver and the rest of the cast sing Edwin Starr's classic song "War," which repeats the lyric "War, huh, good God!" and "Good God, y'all!" numerous times.
  • SEX/NUDITY
  • Gulliver is shown showering from the chest up.
  • Gulliver walks around his apartment wearing a T-shirt and underpants. The shirt comes down far enough so that no bulge is visible.
  • Gulliver plays with "Star Wars" action figures and has them kissing.
  • Gulliver playfully pulls up his shirt and smacks his bare chest and belly.
  • Gulliver's partially bare backside is visible throughout a good part of his first encounter with the Lilliputians. When he is tripped up, he lands buttocks first on a Lilliputian and it is insinuated that the little guy went up Gulliver's sphincter.
  • Princess Mary and Queen Isabelle wear period costumes throughout the film that show off their cleavage. Other background female extras wear similar attire that briefly shows off the same.
  • Gulliver takes advantage of his popularity to have the kingdom's town square turned into a Times Square-like gathering place, complete with large billboards, one of which depicts him as a Calvin Klein-like underwear model.
  • We see no nudity, but Gulliver drops his pants in order to urinate on a fire and many Lilliputians are shown marveling at the size of his genitalia.
  • At a banquet, the Lilliputians have carved an ice sculpture in Gulliver's honor that depicts a man urinating. The figure's hands are over his genitalia, so no "ice penis" is shown.
  • Gulliver is shown face down and shirtless on a masseuse's table as numerous little people walk up and down his back giving him a massage.
  • Gulliver takes off his shirt to wade out into the ocean and confront an enemy armada.
  • Gulliver gives Horatio tips on how to talk to a woman, including such phrases as "Hey sexy" and "I find you incredibly sexy."
  • When Princess Mary asks General Edward what he finds attractive about her, he points to her cleavage.
  • Gulliver and Darcy share a long kiss at the end.
  • Princess Mary and Horatio also share a long kiss at the end.
  • SMOKING
  • None.
  • TENSE FAMILY SCENES
  • Princess Mary's father, King Theodore, is trapped by a raging fire. Gulliver comes to the rescue.
  • Princess Mary and her father and mother are imprisoned by a traitorous General Edward.
  • TOPICS TO TALK ABOUT
  • The original Jonathan Swift version of the story.
  • Ambition and going for the things you want in life.
  • The importance of telling the truth and being true to one's self.
  • Self confidence.
  • Following one's heart vs. doing what is expected.
  • VIOLENCE
  • A typhoon thrashes Gulliver's boat and sends him hard to the deck on a couple of occasions and eventually overboard.
  • Gulliver breaks free of his Lilliputian restraints only to have General Edward stab him in the foot with a spear and the rest of the Lilliputian army regroup and trip him up (he lands buttocks first on a Lilliputian). The fall knocks Gulliver out.
  • Lilliput comes under attack by a rival army of little people who set fire to several buildings.
  • Gulliver fends off an attacking army by picking several of its soldiers up and depositing them in a fountain pool and generally scaring them with his immense size.
  • In anger, General Edward shoves a subordinate hard as he walks away.
  • The enemy returns via an armada of tiny warships. Gulliver wades out into the ocean to meet them. They surround him and fire dozens of cannonballs that embed themselves in his bare midsection. He then exhales and propels the tiny cannonballs at the various ships, causing much damage and various little people being tossed about the different decks. Gulliver then splashes them (which is like tidal waves to the wee ones manning the various boats) after which he takes their mast lines and tows them out to sea in the opposite direction of Lilliput.
  • General Edward defects to the enemy side where he uses Gulliver's blueprints for a toy robot to have them build a giant robot that he controls to fight Gulliver. The robot, under Edward's direction, gives Gulliver a "wedgie" (it grabs him by the underpants and lifts him off the ground) and forces him to surrender and confess to his lies.
  • Princess Mary slaps Horatio hard across the face.
  • A little girl who appears giant sized to Gulliver rips the head off a small stuffed animal to get Gulliver to take part in a tea party.
  • Gulliver and General Edward's fearsome giant robot face off in a climactic battle. Edward programs the robot to shoot electricity at Gulliver, which then thoroughly manhandles him and throws him hard against one of the Lilliputian buildings. Horatio is able to ride up on horseback and climb up inside the robot and deactivate its electrical current, giving his friend a fighting chance. Gulliver is kicked in the crotch and trades punches with the robot. He then employs a series of WWE-style wrestling moves and eventually is able to give the machine a "robot wedgie" by pulling out its wiring from behind.
  • Princess Mary punches General Edward when he tries to take her hostage.



  • Reviewed December 18, 2010 / Posted December 25, 2010

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