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"REIGN OVER ME"
(2007) (Don Cheadle, Adam Sandler) (R)

Alcohol/
Drugs
Blood/Gore Disrespectful/
Bad Attitude
Frightening/
Tense Scenes
Guns/
Weapons
Moderate None Heavy Mild Moderate
Imitative
Behavior
Jump
Scenes
Music
(Scary/Tense)
Music
(Inappropriate)
Profanity
Mild None Minor *None Extreme
Sex/
Nudity
Smoking Tense Family
Scenes
Topics To
Talk About
Violence
Heavy None Heavy Heavy Moderate


QUICK TAKE:
Drama: A dentist tries to help his former college roommate who's still trying to block out the loss of his wife and kids in the terrorist attacks of 9/11.
PLOT:
Alan Johnson (DON CHEADLE) is a dentist with a thriving practice, an attractive wife in Janeane (JADA PINKETT SMITH), and two adorable girls. Yet, he isn't completely happy, not only because he's uneasy about a beautiful patient, Donna Remar (SAFFRON BURROWS), repeatedly coming on to him, but also because Janeane wears the pants in their family, a point he brings up with psychiatrist Angela Oakhurst (LIV TYLER).

Things change when he runs into his former college roommate, Charlie Fineman (ADAM SANDLER), a one-time dentist who gave up his practice and most everything else following the death of his wife and three girls in the terrorist attacks of 9/11. Unable to deal with his grief or the attempts of his in-laws, Jonathan (ROBERT KLEIN) and Ginger Timpleman (MELINDA DILLON) to contact him, Charlie's only social contacts are with his landlady, as well as his former friend turned personal lawyer, Bryan Sugarman (MIKE BINDER), who now watches over Charlie's insurance and government payout funds.

Feeling sorry for his former friend, Alan hangs out with Charlie, playing video games in his apartment and zipping around the city on his motor scooter. His new late-night activities, however, don't sit well with Janeane, putting even more of a strain on their marriage. Yet, Alan is committed to help make Charlie better, and thus tries to do just that, including through Angela and other means.

WILL KIDS WANT TO SEE IT?
Unless they're fans of someone in the cast, it doesn't seem too likely.
WHY THE MPAA RATED IT: R
For language and some sexual references.
CAST AS ROLE MODELS:
  • ADAM SANDLER plays a former dentist who's given up on that and most things in his life following the deaths of his wife and children in the terrorist attacks of 9/11, a loss with which he still cannot cope. Somewhat mentally unstable, he's withdrawn into his own little world, but starts to come out again with Alan's aid. He uses strong profanity, briefly drinks, and contemplates taking his own life to avoid his overwhelming sense of loss.
  • DON CHEADLE plays his former college roommate and current married dentist who spots, befriends, and then tries to help the troubled man. He uses strong profanity, must deal with a strained marriage and Donna coming on to him, and drinks some.
  • JADA PINKETT SMITH plays Alan's wife who wears the pants in their family and isn't happy about him spending a lot of time with Charlie. She drinks some.
  • LIV TYLER plays a psychiatrist who wishes Alan would schedule an appointment with her rather than ambush her on the street, but does try to help Charlie with his issues.
  • SAFFRON BURROWS plays one of Alan's patients who's essentially stalking him and expresses her desire to perform oral sex on him in his office.
  • ROBERT KLEIN and MELINDA DILLON play Charlie's in-laws who are concerned about him, but also somewhat selfish in wanting him to be able to talk about and remember their daughter like they do. They threaten to have him committed when he won't.
  • MIKE BINDER plays Charlie's former best friend and current personal lawyer who's a bit standoffish toward others.
  • CAST, CREW, & TECHNICAL INFO

    HOW OTHERS RATED THIS MOVIE


    Curious if this title is entertaining, any good, and/or has any artistic merit?
    Then read OUR TAKE of this film.


    (Note: The "Our Take" review of this title examines the film's artistic merits and does not take into account any of the possibly objectionable material listed below).


    OUR WORD TO PARENTS:
    Here's a quick look at the content found in this R-rated drama. Profanity consists of at least 23 "f" words, while other expletives and colorful phrases are uttered. Sexually related dialogue is present, mostly related to a female patient desiring to perform oral sex on her male dentist.

    Violence includes police tackling a man holding an empty gun who's trying to get them to kill him. Other less dangerous physical contact occurs, but any of that could be unsettling to sensitive viewers. Various characters have varying degrees of bad attitudes, while tense family (and related thematic) material includes a man still reeling from his family's deaths in the terrorist attacks of 9/11, while a couple's marriage is strained.

    Drinking also occurs, with one bit presumably helping fuel a man's suicidal thoughts. Should you still be concerned about the film's appropriateness for yourself or anyone else in your home, you may want to look more closely at our detailed listings for more specific information regarding the film's content.

    For those prone to visually induced motion sickness, there are varying amounts of handheld camerawork in the film.


    ALCOHOL OR DRUG USE
  • Alan and Janeane have wine with dinner.
  • Alan has a beer, while Janeane has wine.
  • Alan asks Charlie if he wants to get a drink, but Charlie says he can't drink.
  • Alan orders another beer in a club where miscellaneous people also drink.
  • Ginger has wine.
  • Charlie buys liquor and we then see him sitting and watching TV with an open bottle in his hand. That helps prompt him have suicidal thoughts.
  • BLOOD/GORE
  • None.
  • DISRESPECTFUL/BAD ATTITUDE
  • Donna has a crush on Alan, despite being his patient and knowing he's married. She then propositions him sexually, and then reportedly threatens to sue when he turns her down, stating that he came on to her sexually. Alan's partners aren't happy about this (for legal reasons) and tell him he needs to make it go away.
  • Alan repeatedly "ambushes" Angela on the sidewalk to ask professional questions, rather than set up an appointment with her.
  • A bouncer or someone like him angrily tells Charlie (about being late for playing drums at a punker club), "F*ck my ass, retard."
  • When Alan brings up Charlie's family, the latter gets mad and throws his glass of root beer in Alan's face.
  • Janeane is mad at Alan for staying out all night with Charlie.
  • Charlie calls Alan a faggot, but when called on that, says it's offensive to gay people, but not to Alan. When buying tickets to a movie, he says, "One adult and one faggot."
  • The N-word is nearly said by a white character in the movie "Blazing Saddles" (played for comedy).
  • Janeane tells Alan (over the phone, as he's been out all night) that his dad died. Unable to cope with such loss (due to his past), Charlie responds nonchalantly about the news and acts as if nothing happened.
  • Sugarman acts defensively about Charlie and his money in relation to Alan, thus coming off as somewhat mean.
  • In Alan's office complex, Charlie shoves Alan backwards and the two then struggle, with Charlie breaking plaques and other things in the office before Alan gets him to settle down.
  • About a supposed friend of Alan's (really a psychiatrist Alan is hoping can help), Charlie says the man looks like "a giant dork" and "a lump of sh*t someone left on the sidewalk."
  • About Charlie's earlier use of the word, Alan jokingly says that something about Charlie is "kind of faggoty."
  • Charlie's in-laws come off as somewhat selfish in wanting him to share his grief with them, and when he doesn't, they threaten to have him committed.
  • A prosecutor for a mental evaluation hearing purposefully tries to enrage Charlie by talking about and showing photos of his family. About that, the presiding judge says if the prosecutor ever does that again, he'll have hardened criminals use that man for their own (presumably homosexual) purposes.
  • FRIGHTENING SCENES
  • Charlie flees from his former in-laws and gets Alan to hop on the back of his motor scooter. As they zip down the road, they're nearly hit by a bus.
  • Charlie finds a pistol among his belongings and then searches everywhere for some bullets, but can't find any. Wanting to kill himself, he then goes out onto the street, stops a cab by standing in front of it, and then points his empty gun at the cabbie when that man gets out. Some nearby police see that and rush out, with one aiming his gun at Charlie who keeps telling him to just do it (shoot him). The other cop, however, tackles him from behind and the other man then jumps on him as well, with both then pushing Charlie up against a pillar when cuffing and controlling him.
  • GUNS/WEAPONS
  • Charlie and then later Alan play a video game where a human hero carries and uses swords and arrows to battle some sort of giant.
  • We see a statue of soldiers who carry rifles.
  • Charlie finds a pistol among his belongings and then searches everywhere for some bullets, but can't find any. Wanting to kill himself, he then goes out onto the street, stops a cab by standing in front of it, and then points his empty gun at the cabbie when that man gets out. Some nearby police see that and rush out, with one aiming his gun at Charlie who keeps telling him to just do it (shoot him). The other cop, however, tackles him from behind and the other man then jumps on him as well, with both then pushing Charlie up against a pillar when cuffing and controlling him.
  • IMITATIVE BEHAVIOR
  • Phrases: "F*ck my ass, retard," "Answer my f*cking question," "What the f*ck is wrong with you?" "F*ck you," "You are a f*cked up dude," "Get the f*ck out of here," "Get the f*ck up," "That was seriously f*cked up," "That's how f*cked up I still am," "They do sh*t, right?" "It's fifth-grade sh*t," "No sh*t," "Oh sh*t," "We can't keep doing this sh*t," "He looks like a lump of sh*t someone left on the sidewalk," "Bullsh*t," "The whole thing goes to sh*t," "You didn't take sh*t from nobody," "Blow you" and "Go down" (oral sex), "Don't be such a p*ssy," "I hate this damn city," "Are you kidding me?" "The landlady from hell," "That's a load of crap," "That sucks," "Up my ass," "Pissed (off)," "You faggot," "One adult and one faggot" (said to a ticket seller as a joke), "You're an asshole," "Shut the damn window," "What the hell is going on?" "He's a giant dork," "I will beat your ass," "Bozo," "That was kind of faggoty" (said as a joke), "Bastard," "Hell yeah," "If you listen, you'll hear assholes puckering up," "You candy-asses," "That just sucks," "Frickin,'" "Shut up" and "I know you've both been through hell."
  • Miscellaneous men and women have tattoos.
  • We see miscellaneous graffiti.
  • Charlie tries to get some cops to shoot him dead by aiming an empty gun at a cabbie.
  • JUMP SCENES
  • None.
  • MUSIC (SCARY/TENSE)
  • A tiny bit of suspenseful music plays in the film.
  • MUSIC (INAPPROPRIATE)
  • None, but some lyrics in a punk song couldn't be fully heard or understood, thus offering the possibility of them potentially containing objectionable material.
  • PROFANITY
  • At least 23 "f" words (1 used sexually, and 1 mouthed), 17 "s" words, 1 slang term using female genitals ("p*ssy"), 3 for breasts ("t*ts"), 10 asses (3 used with "hole"), 7 damns, 4 hells, 2 craps, 1 S.O.B., 3 uses of "G-damn," 2 each of "For Christ's sakes" and "Jesus" and 1 use of "Swear to God."
  • SEX/NUDITY
  • Trying to convince Charlie that they were college roommates, Alan reminds him that he (Charlie) slept naked and slept-walked, resulting in the worst two years of Alan's life.
  • Donna comes on to Alan in his office, saying that if he wants her to, she would, with her mouth. She adds that she'd do it and enjoy making him happy. Alan is taken aback by this and then tells her to leave.
  • A bouncer or someone like him angrily tells Charlie (about being late for playing drums at a punker club), "F*ck my ass, retard."
  • There's talk of Donna threatening a lawsuit against Alan and his firm, claiming he came on to her in his office. Alan's partners aren't happy about this (for legal reasons) and tell him he needs to make it go away.
  • About Donna, Charlie asks Alan what she wants, and the latter replies, "She wants to go down on me." Later, Charlie says Alan should tell his partners what she wants to do to him: "F*ck you." He then says that she has a lot of problem "if she wants to blow you" and refers to her as "the one who wants your penis."
  • A shower scene in a movie shows a man looking horrified about being in a shower with other men (no nudity, and played as comedy).
  • Charlie makes a hand up and down gesture at his crotch regarding Donna wanting to perform oral sex on Alan. Upon finally seeing her, he asks, "That gorgeous girl wants to blow you?" and then asks if he can go in for him.
  • Donna positions herself in front of Alan who's seated on or leaning back against his desk, stating that she can do "this" (oral sex) quick, but Alan doesn't let her (both are clothed).
  • Alan and Janeane get into an argument over the former's involvement and time spent with Charlie. She then says she heard about "the woman who wanted to go down on you" and wonders how he got rid of that problem. He then sarcastically replies that he just let Donna do it.
  • Pretending that his assistant doesn't speak English, Alan says about Charlie that he's a superhero who stuffs the front of his pants with a sock.
  • Charlie complains that Angela is too young to help him and that she has "nice t*ts." Alan then says he doesn't see the latter as being a problem and Charlie then agrees.
  • When Angela asks Charlie what he thinks about, he blurts out, "Your t*ts," adding that they're round and perfect.
  • A prosecutor for a mental evaluation hearing purposefully tries to enrage Charlie by talking about and showing photos of his family. About that, the presiding judge says if the prosecutor ever does that again, he'll have hardened criminals use that man for their own (presumably homosexual) purposes.
  • SMOKING
  • None.
  • TENSE FAMILY SCENES
  • Alan isn't entirely happy in his marriage, mainly because Janeane makes most of the decisions for them.
  • Charlie has become something of a social hermit following the death of his wife and three daughters in the terrorist attacks of 9/11. For much of the film, he can't deal with or talk about his loss.
  • We hear that Charlie's parents died when he was in grade school.
  • Ginger briefly talks about her granddaughters (in a "missing them" sort of way).
  • Janeane is mad at Alan for staying out all night with Charlie.
  • Janeane tells Alan (over the phone, as he's been out all night) that his dad died. Unable to cope with such loss (due to his past), Charlie responds nonchalantly about the news and acts as if nothing happened. We then later see the funeral scene.
  • Donna admits that she's divorced after her husband of 10 years had an affair.
  • Alan and Janeane get into an argument over the former's involvement and time spent with Charlie. She then says she heard about "the woman who wanted to go down on you" and wonders how he got rid of that problem. He then sarcastically replies that he just let Donna do it.
  • Charlie tells the story of losing his family on 9/11, that he was supposed to fly out and meet them that day, and that he saw the news of the plane crashes on TV. He says he saw and felt the crash impact, and that he felt them burning.
  • Alan tells Janeane that he needs "air" in his relationship with her.
  • Still feeling guilt over doing so years before, Charlie says that he snapped at his wife the last time he talked to her (over her desire to remodel their kitchen).
  • A mental evaluation hearing prosecutor purposefully tries to enrage Charlie by talking about and showing photos of his family (and succeeds).
  • TOPICS TO TALK ABOUT
  • How people respond to personal loss.
  • The events of 9/11.
  • Why Donna comes on to Alan the way she does.
  • Strained marriages.
  • Thoughts of suicide.
  • Dentists.
  • VIOLENCE
  • When Alan brings up Charlie's family, the latter gets mad and throws his glass of root beer in Alan's face.
  • Charlie and then later Alan play a video game where a human hero carries and uses swords and arrows to battle some sort of giant.
  • In Alan's office complex, Charlie shoves Alan backwards and the two then struggle, with Charlie breaking plaques and other things in the office before Alan gets him to settle down.
  • Charlie finds a pistol among his belongings and then searches everywhere for some bullets, but can't find any. Wanting to kill himself, he then goes out onto the street, stops a cab by standing in front of it, and then points his empty gun at the cabbie when that man gets out. Some nearby police see that and rush out, with one aiming his gun at Charlie who keeps telling him to just do it (shoot him). The other cop, however, tackles him from behind and the other man then jumps on him as well, with both then pushing Charlie up against a pillar when cuffing and controlling him.
  • In a montage, we see Charlie throwing something onto a desk in anger while being evaluated.



  • Reviewed March 15, 2007 / Posted March 23, 2007

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