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"MISS POTTER"
(2006) (Renée Zellweger, Ewan McGregor) (PG)

Alcohol/
Drugs
Blood/Gore Disrespectful/
Bad Attitude
Frightening/
Tense Scenes
Guns/
Weapons
Mild None Heavy Mild None
Imitative
Behavior
Jump
Scenes
Music
(Scary/Tense)
Music
(Inappropriate)
Profanity
Minor None None None None
Sex/
Nudity
Smoking Tense Family
Scenes
Topics To
Talk About
Violence
Minor Minor Moderate Moderate None


QUICK TAKE:
Drama: An unmarried woman must overcome various obstacles as she tries to get her children's books published, only to end up falling in love with her publisher.
PLOT:
It's London at the turn of the 20th century, and Beatrix Potter (RENÉE ZELLWEGER) is an unmarried, 32-year-old woman who still lives at home with her parents (BILL PATERSON & BARBARA FLYNN), and whose only constant companion is her older and prim chaperone, Miss Wiggin (MATYELOK GIBBS). That is, except for the fictitious animal characters that populate the children's books she's written, illustrated, and is trying to publish. Her parents think she's wasting her time and should find a husband, but Beatrix disagrees, and often converses with and imagines seeing those drawings coming to life.

Determined to succeed with her literary endeavor, Beatrix eventually meets with sibling publishers Harold Warne (ANTON LESSER) and Fruing Warne (DAVID BAMBER). They agree to represent her work, not because they think it will be successful, but since they see it as an opportunity to preoccupy their younger brother Norman (EWAN McGREGOR) and appease their mother Mrs. Warne (PHYLLIDA LAW). However, Norman takes his assignment seriously and soon has Beatrix's first work, Peter Rabbit, published. With his similarly unmarried and independent sister Millie (EMILY WATSON) befriending Beatrix, Norman ends up spending more time with her, eventually falling in love.

Yet, her parents are against the relationship as they see him below their social status. From that point on, she must contend with that, her growing love for Norman, and her eventual land ownership dealings with real estate agent William Heelis (LLOYD OWEN), a former childhood friend.

WILL KIDS WANT TO SEE IT?
Unless they're fans of someone in the cast, it doesn't seem too likely.
WHY THE MPAA RATED IT: PG
For brief mild language.
CAST AS ROLE MODELS:
  • RENÉE ZELLWEGER plays a 32-year-old woman who still lives at home but must contend with her parents' attitude about her, her books, and her falling in love with Norman who they view as below their social status.
  • EWAN McGREGOR plays a young man who takes on his first assignment -- Beatrix's book -- with passion, and soon falls in love with her.
  • EMILY WATSON plays Norman's unmarried and independent sister who finds a kindred spirit in Beatrix.
  • BARBARA FLYNN plays Beatrix's mother who isn't supportive of her daughter in any way.
  • BILL PATERSON plays her husband, Beatrix's father who's a little softer in such regards.
  • MATYELOK GIBBS plays Beatrix's constant and prim chaperone.
  • LLOYD OWEN plays a real estate agent who knew Beatrix as a child and later sells her property.
  • ANTON LESSER and DAVID BAMBER play Norman's older brothers who only agree to represent Beatrix's work so that Norman has something to do (by working on it).
  • PHYLLIDA LAW plays Norman's ailing but amiable mother who takes a liking to Beatrix.
  • CAST, CREW, & TECHNICAL INFO

    HOW OTHERS RATED THIS MOVIE


    Curious if this title is entertaining, any good, and/or has any artistic merit?
    Then read OUR TAKE of this film.


    (Note: The "Our Take" review of this title examines the film's artistic merits and does not take into account any of the possibly objectionable material listed below).


    OUR WORD TO PARENTS:
    The following is a brief summary of the content found in this PG rated drama. There's no profanity, but a few colorful phrases are present, as is a brief comment about procreation. A major character dies unexpectedly, while various characters have varying degrees of bad attitudes. Much of that involves a snooty woman being demeaning, condescending and unsupportive of her adult daughter.

    Some drinking occurs as does brief smoking, while some thematic elements are present. If you're still concerned about the film and its appropriateness for yourself or anyone else in your home who may be interested in seeing it, we suggest that you take a closer look at our detailed listings for more specific information regarding the film's content.


    ALCOHOL OR DRUG USE
  • Helen tells a maid not to put any brandy in a man's punch unless he asks for it, and then mentions he'll have port after wine, telling the maid to inform her if he's had four.
  • People have wine or champagne at a Christmas party and dinner, and a few have brandy or something similar after that. Norman also pours a little brandy into some after-dinner coffee, with Miss Wiggins downing hers and then either falling asleep or passing out.
  • There's a brief suggestion of someone being hung-over (not seen).
  • BLOOD/GORE
  • None.
  • DISRESPECTFUL/BAD ATTITUDE
  • Norman's one brother doesn't think much of Beatrix's submitted work, but the other does. However, he does so only so that Norman will have something to work on, stating that if he flubs it, it's no big deal.
  • Beatrix's mother is constantly demeaning and belittling to her, mainly because she doesn't think she's behaving the way a proper woman should (getting married and running a household). She says that Beatrix doesn't have any friends; tells her that all girls get married, and that if she doesn't, she asks who will love her; and has a bad attitude toward her daughter's literary aspirations.
  • About Norman showing up at their house, Beatrix's mother says she wishes Beatrix didn't invite trades people to their house as they track in dust.
  • Millie tells Beatrix that men are only good for two things, financial support and procreation.
  • Beatrix is upset when her parents say she can't marry Norman because doing so would be beneath their social status. They think she's acting impulsively, but she says she's going to marry him anyway. They finally come to an agreement where she'll join them for their normal summer vacation (for several months) and that if she still feels the same way, she'll have their blessing.
  • A bidder at an auction has a bad attitude toward Beatrix after she outbids him, but she puts the man in his place.
  • FRIGHTENING SCENES
  • Spoiler Alert: Beatrix receives a letter that Norman is ill, so she rushes to his home from her family's summer estate. When she arrives, Millie informs her that Norman died (we don't know what from, other than Millie saying he developed a cough that got worse), and that she just missed his funeral.
  • Following that, Beatrix imagines all of her painted characters fleeing from her on their pages.
  • GUNS/WEAPONS
  • None.
  • IMITATIVE BEHAVIOR
  • Phrases: "Jolly good," "You're just a pig-headed girl," "Be still, little imps," "Hogwash" and "Rich bastard."
  • JUMP SCENES
  • None.
  • MUSIC (SCARY/TENSE)
  • None.
  • MUSIC (INAPPROPRIATE)
  • None.
  • PROFANITY
  • None.
  • SEX/NUDITY
  • Millie tells Beatrix that men are only good for two things, financial support and procreation.
  • Beatrix's mother shows a little cleavage.
  • SMOKING
  • We briefly see a miscellaneous person smoke.
  • TENSE FAMILY SCENES
  • Beatrix's mother is constantly demeaning and belittling to her, mainly because she doesn't think she's behaving the way a proper woman should (getting married and running a household).
  • Beatrix is upset when her parents say she can't marry Norman because doing so would be beneath their social status. They think she's acting impulsively, but she says she's going to marry him anyway. They finally come to an agreement where she'll join them for their normal summer vacation (for several months) and that if she still feels the same way, she'll have their blessing.
  • Various adult siblings react with varying levels of grief over their brother's unexpected death.
  • TOPICS TO TALK ABOUT
  • The historical accuracy and/or artistic license taken with the true story.
  • Adults who write children's books.
  • Being an independent and unmarried woman in turn of the 20th century London.
  • Beatrix talking to and imagining her illustrated book characters as living beings.
  • Having unsupportive parents.
  • Class elitism (what Beatrix's mother displays).
  • Beatrix's mother telling young Beatrix that all girls get married, and that if she doesn't, she asks who will love her.
  • Millie tells Beatrix that men are only good for two things, financial support and procreation.
  • Beatrix is upset when her parents say she can't marry Norman because doing so would be beneath their social status. They think she's acting impulsively, but she says she's going to marry him anyway. They finally come to an agreement where she'll join them for their normal summer vacation (for several months) and that if she still feels the same way, she'll have their blessing.
  • People selling farmland to developers.
  • VIOLENCE
  • None.



  • Reviewed December 13, 2007 / Posted January 12, 2007

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