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"SHATTERED GLASS"
(2003) (Hayden Christensen, Peter Sarsgaard) (PG-13)

Alcohol/
Drugs
Blood/Gore Disrespectful/
Bad Attitude
Frightening/
Tense Scenes
Guns/
Weapons
Heavy *None Heavy Minor None
Imitative
Behavior
Jump
Scenes
Music
(Scary/Tense)
Music
(Inappropriate)
Profanity
Mild None None None Heavy
Sex/
Nudity
Smoking Tense Family
Scenes
Topics To
Talk About
Violence
Moderate Minor None Moderate None


QUICK TAKE:
Drama: The editor of a prestigious magazine becomes increasingly suspicious about the validity of part or all of the feature stories written by his young star writer.
PLOT:
It's 1998 and Stephen Glass (HAYDEN CHRISTENSEN) is a hotshot journalistic reporter for the highly regarded The New Republic, a publication noted as being the "In-flight magazine of Air Force One." Working alongside the likes of other young staffers such as Caitlin Avery (CHLOE SEVIGNY) and Amy Brand (MELANIE LYNSKEY), Stephen is the toast of the publication thanks to his flamboyant pitches and resultant stories. That's much to the dismay of fellow writer Chuck Lane (PETER SARSGAARD) who can't match Glass' style.

Their editor, Michael Kelly (HANK AZARIA), occasionally questions Stephen on the facts, but otherwise trusts his star journalist. When Kelly is fired over a dispute with the magazine's owner, however, Chuck is named editor, casting a sour spell over the office. It only gets worse when Chuck begins investigating a series of allegations made by Adam Penenberg (STEVE ZAHN) of the online publication Forbes Digital Tool.

With the aid of staffer Andie Fox (ROSARIO DAWSON), Adam has discovered what he believes are falsehoods in Stephen's story about an Internet hacker. As he digs deeper for the truth, Chuck must try to figure out whether Glass is on the up and up, or whether the high flying young journalist - who adamantly stands behind the validity of his work and comes up with explanations or excuses for every discovery - has made up everything.

WILL KIDS WANT TO SEE IT?
Unless they're fans of someone in the cast or are interested in the true story or journalism, it doesn't seem likely that many will.
WHY THE MPAA RATED IT: PG-13
For language, sexual references and brief drug use.
CAST AS ROLE MODELS:
  • HAYDEN CHRISTENSEN plays a flamboyant yet still boyish star reporter for a lofty magazine who must contend with allegations that he made up a published story. He uses some profanity, proclaims his innocence and feels that Chuck is simply out to get him due to jealousy.
  • PETER SARSGAARD plays his new editor who's torn over whether Glass is telling the truth, or is lying about his fabricated story. He ends up investigating and pushing Glass for the truth, ultimately having to make some tough decisions. He uses some profanity.
  • HANK AZARIA plays Glass' former editor who stands by his reporter while his boss, but then begins to question his integrity following the allegations.
  • STEVE ZAHN plays a tenacious online reporter who uncovers what he thinks are fabrications in one of Glass' stories and then digs deeper for the truth. He uses profanity, some of it briefly strong.
  • ROSARIO DAWSON plays his associate who assists him and uses some profanity.
  • CHLOE SEVIGNY plays Stephen's coworker and close friend who doesn't believe the allegations and is mad at Chuck for doing so. She briefly uses some strong profanity.
  • CAST, CREW, & TECHNICAL INFO

    HOW OTHERS RATED THIS MOVIE


    Curious if this title is entertaining, any good, and/or has any artistic merit?
    Then read OUR TAKE of this film.


    (Note: The "Our Take" review of this title examines the film's artistic merits and does not take into account any of the possibly objectionable material listed below).


    OUR WORD TO PARENTS:
    The following is a brief summary of the content found in this drama that's been rated PG-13. Profanity consists of at least 3 "f" words, while other expletives and colorful phrases are uttered. Some sexually related dialogue and items (condoms and cigars related to the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal) are briefly heard or seen.

    Some bad attitudes are present (including from a chronic liar), some people drink and a few people briefly smoke pot. Should you still be concerned about the film's appropriateness for yourself or anyone else in your home, you may want to look more closely at our detailed listings for more specific information regarding the film's content.


    ALCOHOL OR DRUG USE
  • We see some guys smoking pot and drinking liquor from mini-bottles from a hotel room's mini-fridge.
  • Stephen tells Chuck about drugs, binge drinking and hookers (in relation to a story).
  • People have beer at a party.
  • A comment is made about alphabetized beer.
  • We see a beer by Chuck.
  • BLOOD/GORE
  • We see a guy standing at a urinal, but don't see or hear anything related to bodily functions.
  • DISRESPECTFUL/BAD ATTITUDE
  • A young partygoer tells someone to get him and the other guys a "fat heifer" (woman) and that one with bad acne would be better. Later, we see such a young woman trying to get away from them and being rather upset about how she's been treated.
  • Stephen admits that he made assumptions about a mini-bar being at a hotel in a story he wrote.
  • We learn that Stephen made up all or parts of his stories and then lies about doing so in trying to cover himself.
  • Stephen reports on a young computer hacker wanting a lifetime subscription to Playboy and Penthouse as part of an agreement to stop hacking a certain company.
  • FRIGHTENING SCENES
  • Chuck and Stephen are nearly hit by a truck as Stephen absent-mindedly drives through a stop sign.
  • GUNS/WEAPONS
  • None.
  • IMITATIVE BEHAVIOR
  • Phrases: "The new f*cking republic," "F*cking sieve," "Oh sh*t," "This is bullsh*t," "I don't give a sh*t," "Jerks," "Pissed," "What the hell is this?" "Pissy," "Geek," "Smoke blown up your ass," "Screwed up," "Such an asshole," "Pull the G*ddamn car over," "I'm such an idiot," "It's all crap," "Hell of a story" and "What the hell did you do?"
  • Although it shows the negative results of doing so, it's possible the film could inspire kids to make up extravagant stories.
  • JUMP SCENES
  • None.
  • MUSIC (SCARY/TENSE)
  • None.
  • MUSIC (INAPPROPRIATE)
  • None.
  • PROFANITY
  • At least 3 "f" words, 7 "s" words, 1 slang term using male genitals ("pr*ck"), 3 hells, 2 asses (1 used with "hole"), 1 crap, 2 uses each of "G-damn," "Jesus Christ" and "Oh God" and 1 use each of "For Christ's sakes," "For God's sakes" and "Jesus."
  • SEX/NUDITY
  • Stephen attends a conference where there are Clinton-Lewinsky knickknacks such as Monica-condoms (where the packaging says to roll one on your "Slick Willy") and presidential cigars where the wording says they've been rolled on the thighs of interns.
  • Stephen tells Chuck about drugs, binge drinking and hookers (in relation to a story).
  • Stephen tells a story about a male newspaper reporter suddenly with his tongue down Stephen's throat and then comments that he (Stephen) gives people more reasons for them to think he's gay.
  • A comment is made about virgins being at a party and a person wanting to keep them that way.
  • Stephen reports on a young computer hacker wanting a lifetime subscription to Playboy and Penthouse as part of an agreement to stop hacking a certain company.
  • SMOKING
  • A miscellaneous person is briefly seen smoking (seen twice in the film).
  • TENSE FAMILY SCENES
  • None.
  • TOPICS TO TALK ABOUT
  • The historical accuracy of this story.
  • The reasons why people lie.
  • Journalists.
  • We learn that Stephen made up all or parts of his stories and then lies about doing so in trying to cover himself.
  • VIOLENCE
  • None.



  • Reviewed October 20, 2003 / Posted November 7, 2003

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