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"ENTRAPMENT"
(1999) (Sean Connery, Catherine Zeta-Jones) (PG-13)

Alcohol/
Drugs
Blood/Gore Disrespectful/
Bad Attitude
Frightening/
Tense Scenes
Guns/
Weapons
Moderate None Heavy Moderate Moderate
Imitative
Behavior
Jump
Scenes
Music
(Scary/Tense)
Music
(Inappropriate)
Profanity
Mild Minor Moderate None Heavy
Sex/
Nudity
Smoking Tense Family
Scenes
Topics To
Talk About
Violence
Mild Minor None Mild Moderate


QUICK TAKE:
Suspense/Thriller: A young insurance investigator goes undercover as a thief to recruit a world famous and seasoned cat burglar, hoping to entrap him in the middle of a planned heist.
PLOT:
After a priceless Rembrandt is stolen from a highly secured, New York skyscraper in a daring, high-tech cat burglary, insurance investigator Virginia "Gin" Baker (CATHERINE ZETA-JONES) believes the culprit to be sixty-year-old Robert "Mac" MacDougal (SEAN CONNERY), one of the world's greatest art thieves.

Convincing her boss, Hector Cruz (WILL PATTON), to track down MacDougal and entrap him in the middle of another heist, Gin sets out for London to enlist the burglar as her partner in crime. Of course he finds her first, and understandably not trustworthy of her motives, tests her criminal abilities before agreeing to her plan. When she passes and then informs him that she has secret information that will allow them to steal a gold mask, the two vigorously train at his Scottish castle to pull off the heist with the aide of Mac's partner, Thibadeaux (VING RHAMES).

Yet, Gin wants to move on to bigger and better things, and convinces Mac to head to Malaysia for an even bigger heist involving the pending Millennium change, a local crime lord, Conrad Greene (MAURY CHAYKIN), and a conflicting attraction and distrust between the two of them that's certain to get in the way of their planned thievery.

WILL KIDS WANT TO SEE IT?
If they're fans of Connery or Zeta-Jones, they might, but this one seems alluring to older teens at best.
WHY THE MPAA RATED IT: PG-13
For some language, sensuality, violence and drug content.
CAST AS ROLE MODELS:
  • SEAN CONNERY plays a seasoned and proficient cat burglar who reluctantly takes on Gin as his partner and pulls off several heists.
  • CATHERINE ZETA-JONES plays an insurance investigator who goes undercover as a thief to catch Mac, but seems tempted by him and his lifestyle.
  • VING RHAMES plays Mac's burly assistance who uses strong profanity a few times.
  • CAST, CREW, & TECHNICAL INFO

    HOW OTHERS RATED THIS MOVIE


    OUR TAKE: 4.5 out of 10
    Many things have been said about good looks over the years, such as that beauty is only skin deep, lies in the eye of the beholder, and that it, not several biplanes or a fall from the Empire State Building, killed the mighty Kong. For what all of that's worth, one thing is certain. Twentieth Century Fox's release of "Entrapment" should have been titled "Enticement" or perhaps even "Bribery."

    With Sean Connery -- a past recipient of the "Sexiest Man Alive" moniker -- and Catherine Zeta-Jones -- who turned plenty of heads with her role in "The Mask of Zorro" and is considered by many to be one of the most beautiful actresses working today -- there's little doubt that the studio's promotional efforts will include enticing the audience to attend the movie in exchange for a near two-hour look at these attractive performers.

    A technologically updated retelling of the classic cat burglar plot popularized in movies such as "To Catch A Thief" and even the "Pink Panther" films, this moderately enjoyable yarn relies heavily on its stars' good looks to get you through its slower and often contrived moments.

    Featuring three fun and occasionally gripping -- albeit often implausible -- theft sequences, the film is otherwise flat as a pancake in nearly every other aspect and moment. Despite their good looks and the teasing of a typical Hollywood May/December romantic pairing, the chemistry never feels right between the two leads on either a romantic or professional level.

    While we realize that's partially intentional and that some conflict is necessary to generate sparks and overall drama, their non-action moments together feel about as contrived and unnatural as can be imagined. The dialogue -- no matter Connery's always reliable and otherwise convincing vocal delivery -- often sounds too artificial and forced, as does Mac's all too easy acceptance of Gin's initial partnership offer.

    Although this is later explained/justified -- just as was the case with last week's "eXistenZ" -- the damage is immediately done, making the audience question the believability of what occurs, thus giving the film something of a sloppy feel.

    Most moviegoers, however, will probably cut the film some slack due to the slickly produced, audience pleasing sequences involving the carefully conceived and meticulously choreographed heists.

    Although the third such event often strains the loosest credibility -- especially in comparison to the seemingly easier heist that took many days to stage -- and leads up to a hokey and unbelievable ending, the screenplay by Ron Bass ("My Best Friend's Wedding," "Rainman") and William Broyles ("Apollo 13") offers enough "they're gonna get caught" moments to keep things lively and counter the film's more lowly and all too obvious "difficulties."

    Nonetheless, they and director Jon Amiel ("The Man Who Knew Too Little," "Copycat") not only deliver a plot full of contrivances and other problems, but also miss some decent chances to make the film a bit more fun. Since the on-screen titles focus our attention on the days counting down to the new millennium -- which is when the film is set and a fact that weakly ties into the last heist (all of which leads us to anticipate something grand to occur at that moment, but never does) -- the filmmakers should have included a Y2K (Year 2000) glitch to complicate the thieves' plan.

    Unfortunately, they don't, and while they try to add some character-related twists and turns during the proceedings, they're mostly uneventful and not as effective as they should be or as Amiel and company probably intended.

    Fortunately for the film, Sean Connery and Catherine Zeta-Jones are present to distract the audience from the picture's faults. While "The Avengers" disaster proved that even the great Connery can't save every film in which he appears, his persona works well here in countering his mostly flat, predictable and underwritten character.

    Zeta-Jones ("The Mask of Zorro" and the upcoming "The Haunting") is obviously quite easy on the eyes, but also shows that she's got what it takes to become a believable and more than satisfactory leading lady. Although she has to suffer through some poorly written dialogue and unbelievable plot development, Zeta-Jones does it with such confidence and finesse that she makes buying into her character relatively easy.

    Essentially just a two-character film, the supporting roles are few and far in between and don't appear on screen for more than just a few minutes. As such, Ving Rhames ("Out of Sight," "Mission: Impossible") is good but in reality is just "phoning in" his performance that he's already done so often before. Meanwhile, Will Patton ("Armageddon," "The Postman") plays his role so intensely and almost to the point of being villainous that you half expect to see him twirling an oily moustache while delivering his lines.

    Like the best cat burglary heists, making a successful film involves lots of planning, plenty of rehearsals and quite often, nothing but simple and unpredictable good luck. While the filmmakers have gathered the correct elements for this job, they don't pull it off to the best of their abilities.

    Moderately enjoyable, the film has two attractive leads and some entertaining heist sequences going for it, but more often than not seems more intent on showing Zeta-Jones' shapely body than telling a decent or completely believable story. While that's not completely a bad thing, it doesn't necessarily make for a great movie. As such, we give "Entrapment" a 4.5 out of 10.

    OUR WORD TO PARENTS:
    The following is a brief summary of the content found in this PG-13 rated film. Profanity is heavy due to the use of 2 "f" words, and other words and phrases are also uttered during the film. One scene has very brief drug use by a minor character (some other drinking occurs), while several scenes feature mostly non-explicit, but somewhat sensual glimpses of Zeta-Jones' bare skin (and a Rembrandt painting shows a bare-breasted woman).

    Some sequences may be tense/suspenseful to some viewers, including some moderately violent scenes where people are briefly threatened with guns and/or knives. In addition, the major characters are involved in robbery related activities that are made to look cool and exciting.

    While it's uncertain how many kids will want to see this film, you may want to take a closer look at the listed content should you still be concerned about its appropriateness for anyone in your home.


    ALCOHOL OR DRUG USE
  • Greene's assistant lights up a bong of sorts for his boss.
  • Mac and Gin drink whiskey.
  • Gin pours herself a drink.
  • Mac has a drink.
  • Gin carries drinks for herself and Mac up to the roof of his castle.
  • People have champagne at a ball.
  • Gin drinks a beer and then goes and gets one for herself and Mac.
  • Gin has a drink.
  • BLOOD/GORE
  • None.
  • DISRESPECTFUL/BAD ATTITUDE
  • Some of the film's characters are thieves/criminals involved in the thefts of paintings and other valuable holdings.
  • Thibadeaux refers to Gin as "the honey."
  • FRIGHTENING SCENES
  • The criminal heists that occur in several sequences (where the thieves are nearly discovered or captured), and which last for several minutes may be somewhat suspenseful or tense to some viewers. In one of them, Mac and Gin must cross some metal cables hung hundreds of feet above the ground between two buildings. The cable at their feet breaks first, causing them to dangle from their hands, and the other then also breaks, sending them swinging like a pendulum until they grab a support and slowly crawl up it.
  • Gin awakens to find the gun under her pillow missing and then hears a noise in her hotel room (that turns out to be Mac).
  • A criminal store owner holds a knife to Gin's face after she demands to see the real vase she's supposed to pick up for Mac. She then hits that owner over the head with a vase, breaking it and knocking him silly. She then runs out to the car where the owner's assistant breaks one of its windows. Mac then punches this man who in turn takes his knife and jams it through the top of their convertible. They then drive off -- smashing into things -- and the store owner comes out and fires several shots at them with his gun.
  • After we know that Mac is wise to Gin's plan, we see her walking along his rooftop ledge when he encounters her and briefly acts menacing toward her.
  • Mac, who's sitting in a boat, grabs Gin (who's alongside the boat in the water) by her head and repeatedly dunks her underwater to make her tell him the truth.
  • GUNS/WEAPONS
  • Handguns: Given to Gin by Hector to use as protection (we later see that she's sleeping with it under her pillow), used by a store owner to shoot at Gin and Mac as they flee in a car, carried by Greene's men, and Gin briefly holds one to Mac.
  • Knife: Held by a villainous store owner to Gin's face and later used by his assistant to stab through the roof of a convertible, and one is briefly held to Mac's throat by Gin to make him stop dunking her underwater.
  • Machine guns: Carried by guards and SWAT members.
  • IMITATIVE BEHAVIOR
  • Phrases: "Honey" (for a woman), "You little bitch" (said toward Gin), "Bastard," "Sucks" and "Screwing" (nonsexual).
  • The fact that stealing valuable objects is made to look cool and sexy may inspire some kids to think about doing the same.
  • Gin balances herself on and walks across a beam high above the floor in Mac's castle.
  • Someone sprays mace into the eyes of another person as part of another heist plan.
  • JUMP SCENES
  • A bird suddenly surprises Gin.
  • MUSIC (SCARY/TENSE)
  • A moderate amount of suspenseful and ominous music (sometimes a bit action-oriented) plays in different scenes.
  • MUSIC (INAPPROPRIATE)
  • None.
  • PROFANITY
  • At least 2 "f" words, 8 "s" words, 5 hells, 5 damns, 1 S.O.B., and 3 uses of "Oh God," 2 of "God" and 1 use each of "Oh my God," "Jesus" and "Swear to God" as exclamations.
  • SEX/NUDITY
  • A stolen Rembrandt painting shows a bare-breasted woman (that we see in several scenes).
  • Gin sits up in bed nude when she hears a noise in the room. We alternately see her bare back or her from her upper torso up (as Mac's body blocks most of her breasts and anything below them). We do see some glimpses of parts of her bare breasts, however, as well as some cleavage when she pulls up the sheets to cover herself (after he comments on her being naked).
  • Mac asks Gin if there's been anyone that she hasn't been able to manipulate, beguile or seduce, and she says that there hasn't.
  • As Gin slowly gyrates her body through a series of ropes situated to represent security laser beams, the camera focuses on her tightly clothed butt as it sticks up in the air, and in a later but similar scene, Mac favorably groans as he sees the same sight.
  • Mac sees Gin sleeping in their Malaysian room. As he walks over to her, we see her bare back, side and part of her bare hip. He then covers those exposed parts with the sheets.
  • Gin passionately kisses Mac on the floor, but he stops her and gets up.
  • SMOKING
  • One of Greene's men smokes and a store owner smokes, while Thibadeaux smokes a cigar and another man holds an unlit one.
  • TENSE FAMILY SCENES
  • None.
  • TOPICS TO TALK ABOUT
  • The fact that the movie makes cat burglary look cool, exciting and sexy.
  • That Hollywood commonly pairs an attractive woman with an attractive man easily old enough to be her father.
  • VIOLENCE
  • A criminal store owner holds a knife to Gin's face after she demands to see the real vase she's supposed to pick up for Mac. She then hits that owner over the head with a vase, breaking it and knocking him silly. She then runs out to the car where the owner's assistant breaks one of its windows. Mac then punches this man who in turn takes his knife and jams it through the top of their convertible. They then drive off -- smashing into things -- and the store owner comes out and fires several shots at them with his gun.
  • Mac, who's sitting in a boat, grabs Gin (who's alongside the boat in the water) by her head and repeatedly dunks her underwater to make her tell him the truth. She then takes her knife and briefly holds it to his throat to make him stop.
  • Someone sprays mace into the eyes of another person as part of another heist plan.
  • Gin repeatedly hits Mac with a heavy case and kicks him once until he grabs and pins her to the floor.
  • Two men violently grab Gin and escort her away.
  • Mac breaks a large window to escape from a room.
  • Gin briefly holds a gun to Mac's head.



  • Reviewed April 26, 1999 / Posted April 30, 1999

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